Western Canada's support for Swine Health and Disease Surveillance

About CWSHIN

CWSHIN connects members of the swine sector from across western Canada to share information on current swine health trends. We are a surveillance system imbedded in an intelligence network.

Using elements of science, management, communication and documentation, CWSHIN:

  1. Applies modern surveillance and epidemiologic methods to data collected from practitioners, laboratories, abattoirs, etc., and provide swine health intelligence to producers and swine veterinarians in western Canada.
  2. Monitors worldwide swine health trends, to allow for a better understanding of advances and potential threats.
  3. Strengthens the surveillance system and intelligence network through strong governance within the CWSHIN team and collaboration with swine health stakeholders.
  4. Communicates with producers, practitioners and governments to grow the network.
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CWSHIN OBJECTIVES

OBJECTIVES 1
Early detection of emerging swine health issues, such as increased prevalence of common diseases or minimizing the impact of new diseases to the sector.
OBJECTIVES 2
Improving control of diseases by integrating response information to regional health issues.
OBJECTIVES 3 v2
Providing western Canadian producers and veterinarians with current regional, national and international disease information.
OBJECTIVES 4
Maintaining international market access by providing evidence of the absence of reportable disease.

WHAT'S NEW

CWSHIN REPORT ON SWINE HEALTH SURVEILLANCE FOR 2nd QUARTER 2020 (APRIL TO June) – 12 August 2020

Messages

The result of the “Purple sows” investigation (see last quarter) was that the condition seems to be very rare and PCV3 (Porcine circovirus 3) may be only one of many pathogens that can cause purple sows.

An increase in diarrhea (Digestive syndrome) was driven by three diseases Colibacillosis, Rotavirus and Salmonella. It was observed that Salmonella was isolated more frequently – usually together with another pathogen. Diarrhea with no mortality in late nursery caused concern as a differential to PED.

In a batch of good looking pigs, 10% were condemned at slaughter with lung lesions. APP (Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 12) was confirmed by laboratory diagnosis. APP primarily affects pigs of 8 to 16 weeks. The key clinical signs include heavy breathing difficulties; blueing of the ears; sudden death with bleeding from the nose. The incubation period is very short, as little as 12 hours through to three days. Toxins produce severe damage to the lungs

Practical tips from the report

Watch out for “purple sows”; diarrhea; and sever lung disease. Contact you herd practitioner:

  • when you see “purple sows”
  • when you see unusual diarrhea
  • if your finishers have: a short cough; severe heavy breathing difficulties – sitting with open mouth and pumping flanks

Biosecurity – protect your pigs

If you feel sick (flu-like symptoms, cough, fever), stay home.

Discuss and review barriers and possibility for contact between your farmed pigs and wild pigs with your herd practitioner.

Assembly yards, layover facilities etc. (high traffic & high-risk facilities) and connected transport continue to be a risk for PED.

Producers are reminded that infected manure is a possible route of disease introduction and to take extra precautions when spreading possibly infected manure.

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GOVERNANCE

The CWSHIN Board of Directors is comprised of representatives from each of the western pork boards, with the western provincial agriculture ministries holding ex-officio status. The Manager of CWSHIN reports to the Board and oversees all of the organization’s activities. Within the organization, there are two working groups providing additional leadership and guidance: the Quarterly Team and the Scientific Technical Group.

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Management

Dr. Jette Christensen DVM, PhD, joined CWSHIN in April 2018.

Dr. Christensen has 30 years of experience in all phases of national animal health monitoring, surveillance and disease control programs gained from field work in Denmark and Canada, including:

  • General veterinary practice as one of two veterinarians serving more than 110 swine producers
  • National animal surveillance in Denmark with: Danish veterinary Service (veterinary authority); Danish Bacon and Meat Council (national swine industry); Veterinary Laboratory (national reference laboratory)
  • National surveillance in Canada with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) from 2001-2017
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